J.E.R.F. Pinky swear it does not involve cauliflower

J.E.R.F.

 

Today’s nutrition tip is brought to you by the acronym J.E.R.F. – Just Eat Real Food. There are a million ways to spin off of this word (and the relative term real) but the direction I am going to is with ‘pseudo’ foods. Bare with me … I promise you don’t need to eat cauliflower to feel the love.

 

Last week I posted this silly quote on social media:

 

cauliflower

 

And while it definitely made my chuckle – it also made me realize just how many foods we come across on a day-day basis are foods that have turned into things they really are not:

 

    1. Cauliflower pizza
    2. Cauliflower tots
    3. Cauliflower rice
    4. Mashed cauliflower
    5. Noodles made from zucchini, carrots, butternut squash
    6. Coconut ice cream
    7. Riced broccoli
    8. Impossible burgers– non-meat burgers that ‘bleed’ beet juice
    9. You get my point here 🙂

 

Cauliflower pizza IS NOT pizza.

And truth be told most versions don’t even remotely come close to the real deal pizza. In all honesty, most cauliflower pizza is not EVEN that much healthier. The crust is generally made with cheese, eggs and more cheese. I have nothing against cheese or eggs– but when you spec it out most can clock in just as high in calories as regular pizza depending on the toppings.

 

I love zoodles every. once. in and a while.

Of course they are a vegetable high in fiber, nutrients and vitamins and minerals. But what is wrong with having real pasta every once and a while? Yes – I know the carbs. But say you really love pasta why not just have the real deal occasionally in small amounts?

 

Riced broccoli — first of all have you tried it? It tastes just like broccoli! But are you surprised. Likely not because it IS broccoli.

 

Anything vegan trying to resemble meat – my only question is a big fat WHY?

Why not just eat real meat if that is the flavor, texture profile you are going for. I can only get away with saying that because I was a vegetarian for 10 years, a vegan for 2 years and a raw vegan for 1 year. I also used to have long dread locks and lived in Costa Rica – so go figure! Now I eat meat – love it – and often I am embarrassed to tell you that I used to eat something called “tuno.” No that is not an expensive Italian tuna in a high grade olive oil. Tuno was a ‘fake’ vegetarian based “tuna” that came in a can and smelled like tuna. Wicked gross.

 

Bottom Line

 

My point here is don’t eat foods because you feel like you have to. If you love riced broccoli then … rock on with your bad self! But don’t feel like you have to love it and convince yourself it tastes like rice. Because it certainly doesn’t! Also remember – you don’t have to be anyone or anything you don’t want to be. So why should your food be any different?

 

You don’t have to eat cauliflower pizza and ‘pretend’ it is delicious. Why not just head down to Modern Pizza once a month and tear it up? (When you do might I suggest the Veggie Bomb with hot cherry peppers!)

 

Furthermore, you don’t have to kill yourself and do a Whole-30 and deprive yourself of dairy when you love cheese. What are you going to do after you the 30 days? Will you never. ever. ever. return to eating your favorite food group? Survey says – I think not my friend! So why torture yourself and take something out of your diet you love. We have to be realistic with our food choices. If not then behavior change becomes unsustainable and we crash and burn every single time.

 

You see pizza, tater tots, rice and pasta are NOT the enemy. It is the way we abuse these foods and our relationship with them that makes them unhealthy.

 

Love yourself enough to eat the real deal

 

Do you think eating pizza or cheese for that matter will completely derail all your hard work? Hardly. Eating them every day – highly likely! But occasionally eating the foods you love — you know the ones that puts a smile on your face — should be part of your lifestyle These foods are not something you should try to replace. Because you and I both know there is absolutely no replacement for great REAL high quality food.

 

See part of the cool thing about the food we put into our bodies is that for many of us it is one the few things in life we can control. So why not make a pack to yourself that you are no longer going to eat something just because you feel like you should. You are no longer going to feel bad because you just don’t love spaghetti squash. Instead you are going to have a small serving of the real deal with some awesome sauce and homemade meatballs and call a night. You are not going to feel bad. You are not going to feel like you failed. Instead, you are going to be proud that you made a conscious decision to eat real food that made your little heart sing.

 

I wanted to leave you with some parting words 🙂

 

cauliflower

Amy’s Three Killer Tips to Grocery Shopping Like a Champ

 

I hope you are having an all-star start to your week. Coming off the weekend is alway tough. However, there is no day better than Monday to get back on track. It is time to shake off the Monday blues and bring your focus back to healthy eating. Your first stop – the grocery store. Today I am here to provide you with my three absolute BEST tips to grocery shopping like the champ you are. Put down that grocery store hater-ade and grab yourself a cart. Things are about to get fun!

 

 

 

grocery shopping tips

Grab a cart and get your shop on 🙂

 

 

 

Grocery shopping is pretty much one of my favorite past times. I guess you could even call it a hobby of some sort! Anyone who knows me – knows I love grocery stores. No matter where in the world I might be I am constantly on the look out for grocery stores so I can check out the latest and greatest food finds.

 

However, with that being said shopping aimlessly is never a good thing. BAD things happen in grocery stores for Amy Plano when she does not have a plan. And I can only imagine the same goes for many of you! Please tell me I am not alone?

 

So today I am going to rattle off some of my top ticks for staying on track with your diet at the grocery store. I know none of these are new concepts to you. However, if you are like me, I can ALWAYS benefit from gentle reminders on how to improve my behavior.

 

 

Game plan it on Friday

 

 

I have a rule for myself on Friday afternoons. I cannot leave until I have written down at least two things I am cooking for dinner for the up and coming week. For the other meals I fill in the blanks with leftovers or go-to meals. Easy ones like baked chicken thighs or flank steak on the grill rounding out with some Trader Joe’s frozen veggies. However, I must have two concrete (not made up in my head as I have a tendency to do!) meals that I commit to making before I walk out the door. No ifs, ands or buts about it. That way when I go to the grocery store I am exciting about what I am buying.

 

 

 

I generally just pull up my Pinterest board called “Dinner” (yes – super original) and see what looks interesting and is hopefully in season. Here is the link for my dinner board in case you need some inspiration. Once I have identified the recipes I jot down the ingredients I will need in my spiral plain Jane notebook. This when I go home I know what I need and can compare it against what foods I already have.

 

 

 

A typical entry might look like this:

 

 

Monday: Baked chicken thighs, Trader Joe’s frozen sweet potatoes & broccoli

Tuesday: Egg Roll in a Bowl

Wednesday: Sushi

Thursday: Crock Pot Chicken Chili

Friday: Low Carb Chicken Quesadillas with cabbage lime slaw

Saturday: Out

Sunday: Flank Steak, Baked Potatoes and Salad

 

 

It is important to note these dinner recipes do not need to be fancy! Nor does your weekly ‘meal plan’ need to be elaborate. People get wrapped up in the semantics. They say to themselves I don’t know what to make that is healthy. Come on. You know what is healthy and what is not. You do not need me to tell you day-day what you should eat. These meals should be something everyone enjoys and resembles something relatively healthy. Depending upon your family the term relatively healthy likely means different things. But don’t sweat the small things.

 

 

 

Just write it down – the very act of writing things down help sets you up to succeed. Plan to succeed right from the start.

 

 

grocery store

I know you have heard this quote a zillion times – but the message never gets old.

 

 

 

By planning ahead on Friday you will save yourself a ton of stress, time and money at the grocery store. It really puts YOU in the driver seat rather than leaving your meals to chance. So many of my patients do awesome all day with healthy eating. But then dinner rolls around and nothing is planned – so they reach for what is most convenient but not always healthy. They then beat themselves up. By coming up with a plan before the fact this can easily be avoided.

 

 

Because you and I both know when we go to the grocery store with no meals planned – food goes to waste and we come home with food but no meals = no bueno 🙁  It’s like having a closet full of awesome clothes – but no perfect “outfits”. We aint’ got time for that!

 

 

 

Make a list and stick with it

 

 

DO NOT step foot in any grocery store without a list. Okay – I admit I am the worst at this. However, we all need to raise the bar and follow through with grocery list making. Maybe I should start a self-help group for this? Honestly.  I don’t care if you need to scribble the list down on a receipt you find in your purse. You MUST have a shopping list BEFORE you step foot in that grocery store.

 

grocery store

Just write it down – the very act of writing things down sets you up to succeed

 

 

 

Shopping with a list is so critical. Not only does it save money because you are only buying exactly what you need – it also saves you from buying less than stellar foods that were not on your list. By making a list and sticking to it you can get in and out of the grocery store without cruising down every aisle wondering, “Do I need these delicious bourbon pickles from Traders?” – nope not on the list. Move on sista’!

 

 

 

The Type A person in me likes to arrange my list on how the store is set up.  The list often starts with vegetables, then fruit, next protein and ultimately the dairy aisle. That way I don’t need to back track. Also the crazy dietitian in me likes to play a game when I grocery shop. I like to see if I can only manage to shop the perimeter of the grocery store. As it is really in the aisles that most people get into trouble with processed foods. Sometimes I am successful – sometimes not. However, I do make a point to spend more time out of the aisles if possible. But sometimes those Ghost Pepper Potato Chips do call my name in aisle 3 🙁

 

 

Never ever shop hungry

 

I know this one is really a no brainer – but nothing good ever comes of going to the grocery store hungry. I don’t care what you eat – whether it be a meal or a snack – but dear friend please have something! If not everything looks good. You end up buying things that you would have never have even contemplated putting in your cart.

 

grocery shopping tips

 

 

And guess what? If it ends up in your cart – it ends up in your house. And if it is in your house — you will likely eat it 🙂

 

So why not avoid this nonsense all together? Keep healthy snacks in your car. Some suggestions include single serving packs of almonds, RX bars, single serving packet of trail mix, small bags of popcorn, and my personal favorite beef jerky.

 

 

 

Well my friends that is hopefully motivation on this Monday to get your butt in gear.  Happy grocery shopping and hope to see you at Traders, Shop Rite, Whole Foods, Aldi’s or Costco or any other grocery store in between.

 

 

Need help navigating the jungle that we call the grocery store? Did you know the dietitians at The Plano Program conduct both one-one and group grocery shopping tours? Well we sure do!  Email us us at amy.plano@yahoo.com to sign up.

Hugs & High Fives,
  grocery shopping

 

 

Part 3: How to Smash Your 2019 Nutrition Goals

 

 

So, I gave you some time off last week from having to think too hard 🙂 But, I am coming back at you with a vengeance today. This week we are finishing up your favorite topic – good ol’ goal setting. So, grab your nutrition goals that you have been working on so diligently and let’s get to work! 

 

To clarify once again these are the five key steps to goal setting to ensure your success. If you are coming in late to the game and want to revisit the first two steps of nutrition goal setting click here to read Part 1 of How to Crush your Nutrition Goals and click here to read Part 2 of How to Crush your Nutrition Goals.  

 

goals

 

 

Consequently, this week we are tackling # 3: Create an effective monitoring tool # 4: Execute your goals like the champ you are and # 5: Assess your goals at regular intervals

 

 

#3 – Create an effective monitoring tool

 

So, you let’s recap. In short, so far we have helped you clearly define your S.M.A.R.T nutrition goals. Next we helped you set a realistic game plan. However, now you need an effective tool to monitor these goals.

 

You have heard the saying, “What gets measured, gets managed.” Well my friends, this certainly applies to setting nutrition goals. Pick a ‘tool’ – any ‘tool’ to manage your goals.

 

 

goals

 

 

Below are examples of tools to help monitor and track your progress towards your nutrition goals. Please note depending upon what your personal nutrition or exercise goal is not all these tools may be applicable. I provide them just to demonstrate the various ways in which you can track your success.

 

  • A FREE tracking app like ‘My Fitness Pal, Lose It or Sparkpeople
  • An exercise journal
  • A food journal
  • Physical body assessments like body fat percentages as well as waist, hip, bust and bicep measurements
  • A real, live person to report your successes to weekly (like an accountability buddy!)
  • An exercise tracking device like an iwatch or fitbit
  • Before and after pictures
  • Lab values
  • Performance markers like amount of weight lifted, time trials, Vo2Max, ect.

 

Notice many of them are by no means fancy. But all of them get the job done. However, keep in mind the best monitoring tool is the one you are likely to consistently use.

 

I am old-school and use a good old fashion journal. For some reason I feel much more comfortable writing my goals down.

 

goals

 

But you may find that boring and rather log your food or nutrition in an app. Whatever you choose – just stick with it!

 

#4 – Execute your goals like the champ you are

 

Just. Do. It. In order to be successful with your goals, you need to be 110 % committed to taking action. Talk is cheap.  And just like Benjamin Franklin once said Well done is better than well said.”  I don’t think anyone can argue with that.

 

So, put on your blinders. Get comfortable being uncomfortable and just do it. Pull out your goals each every morning and every night. Focus on what is important NOW! Because I hate to be the bearer of bad news but If you don’t prioritize your goals and life for that matter – someone else will.  

 

#5 – Assess your goals at regular intervals

 

Remember your nutrition and exercise goals are not carved in stone. In other words, they should be dynamic and evolving in nature. Therefore, it is important to revisit them at regular intervals and make sure they are serving you. Here are some questions to ask yourself when assessing your goals:

 

  • Am I happy with my progress? Yes? No? Why?
  • What am I most proud of and why?
  • What do I need to be doing differently to ensure my continued success?
  • What are repeated barriers that are standing in my way to succeeding? How can I bullet-proof them?
  • How can I  high-five myself for a job well done?
  • What is the next behavior I want to tackle and why?

 

My new favorite quote is from the book You are a Badass by Jen Sincero. I think it pretty much sums up goal setting perfectly, “There is nothing as unstoppable as a freight train full of fuck-yeahs.”

 

 

goals

 

 

In conclusion, hone your goal setting skills, take your health seriously, DO what you need to be successful, invest in yourself, practice your ass off, fail, fall down, but above all get right back up. Repeat 🙂

 

 

Hugs & High Fives,

goals

 

 

 

P.S. Having a hard time getting back up? Heck we have all been there! Feel free to reach out to the dietitians at The Plano Program to set up a consult to help get you on track to where you want to be going.

 

P.P.S. Love yourself – you are capable of anything.

Amy’s Number One Resource for Meal Prep

SO if you know me at all – you know that I love to cook! Therefore, it is no surprise that one of my favorite websites is called The Kitchn. If you have not checked it out it is a fun website geared towards the home cook. They offer articles on everything from cool new gadgets to Whole-30 compliant recipes. It is a food dork’s black hole. Therefore, please be warned you can really get lost on the site 🙂 Most importantly, their latest and greatest resource? A weekly newsletter aimed at

healthy meal prep.

Sign. Me. Up.

 

In January of this year The Kitchn started offering a FREE Meal Prep Newsletter in which they send out a weekly email that features doable plans and helpful recipes so you can prep, cook, and eat for the week ahead. The best part – they think of the healthy recipes so you don’t have to.
meal prep

Free newsletter with healthy meal prep options? Sign me up!

Most importantly did I mention this newsletter is FREE – delivered straight to your inbox 🙂 If that is not a win – then I don’t know what is.

 

You Know YOU Wanna

 

Above all in my heart of hearts I honestly feel like most people want to eat healthy. However, I also feel like most people don’t take the time to do the necessary things to set themselves up to succeed – like meal prep. Call it laziness. Call lack of focus. Call it whatever you want. Most people have solid nutrition goals – they just choose NOT to make them a priority.

meal prep

Get your prep on!

A couple weeks ago we talked about the importance of goal setting. We actually used the example of meal prep. If you need a littler refresher on goal setting click here for the full details. Success means not only shopping for the right foods but also engaging in meal prep. Furthermore, I think this quote pretty much sums up successful meal prep.

 “Success is where preparation and opportunity meet.” — Bobby Unser

Therefore,  when you and your family are 50 shades of “hangry” there is awesome, tasty, healthy food available.

 

Just Do It

 

So I encourage you to sign up for this newsletter. I think it could be very helpful. A resource like this has the potential to provides SO many things – inspiration, focus, motivation and even a definitive answer for the age old question, “What’s for dinner?”  And after all, who does not want to learn how to cook fast, shop smart, and eat well? I know this chick does!

Need Additional Inspiration?

 

Sorry there is no other way to put it. I am a Pinterest whore. I simply ♥ Pinterest.

mela prep

Sometimes I just want to look at pretty food. Is that too much to ask?

 

So if you need a little ‘pick me up’ or a bit of inspiration follow my modest Meal Prep Pinterest board.  Also if you are just looking for suggestions for dinner please follow my main pinterest board with all sorts of healthy dinner options! I have over 2000 healthy recipes Amy Plano approved 🙂 Get your eat on!

Hugs & High Fives,

meal prep

Part 2: How to Smash Your 2019 Nutrition Goals

So last week we talked about the importance of goal setting. And guess what? This week we are going to continue the conversation. It is really that important.

 

Like I mentioned there are what I like to consider five key steps to goal setting to ensure your success.

 

goal setting

 

Sooooo … last week we hammered the importance of step 1 – defining super duper CLEAR goals. We talked at length about how to clearly define your nutrition goals. How could you forget right? Remember I asked you to tattoo the acronym S.M.A.R.T on your wrist? Kidding! But just in case you need a refresher you can catch up here. But no worries – no tattooing this week, I promise.

 

Establish a realistic game plan

 

This week we are going to chat about the importance of coming up with a clear, realistic and effective game plan for your nutrition goals. This game plan will represent the exact steps you need to do to tackle your goals.

 

goal setting

 

 

It is here, in this step, that we take the S.M.A.R.T goals we have defined and add an actionable component. Without this very important piece you will be likely left spinning your wheels. 

 

So let’s use the goal of meal prepping. We came up with this S.M.A.R.T goal last week:

 

I will meal prep 1.5 hours every Sunday and Wednesday for the next month.

 

We made sure our goal was specific, that it was measurable, attainable, realistic and was time-sensitive. So this plan sounds great in theory, right? It looks good on paper, but how can we make sure we accomplish it?

 

Break your goal into bite size pieces

 

Well, we need to break down the goal into smaller steps. We need to identify EACH step that needs to be completed in order for us to be successful.  Then we need to come up with a game plan surrounding these actions.

 

Sweat the small things – the details matter

 

With a goal like meal prepping here are some of the questions you may need to ask yourself to ‘flesh’ out the mandatory steps to ensure your success.

 

Exactly what am I going to eat for the week? Breakfast? Lunch? Dinners? Snacks?

What specific food do I already have on hand that I should use up?

Exactly when and where am I going to grocery shop?

 

You have to get very specific. For each question there should be a very finite answer. No matter how clear your goal is – unless you outline the necessary steps there is just too much room for error.

 

It’s go-time

So the game plan might look like this:

 

goal setting

 

 

I would highly suggest putting all of this in writing. Write out your menu. Print or electronically save your recipes. I have a board in Pinterest called ‘dinners’ (yes, super creative!) that you are more than welcome to follow for inspiration. I also have a board called ‘Meal Prep’ that you might find equally as helpful. Write in your schedule exactly when you will go grocery shopping.

 

The more specific you get with your actions the increased likelihood of you connecting with your goals. Creating clear concrete goals is important. But coming up with game plan is equally as important.

 

Need help creating a game plan for your nutrition goals? The dietitians at The Plano Program are here to help. Click here to schedule your 60 minute initial consultation.

 

Hugs & High Fives,

goal setting

 

 

P.S. Got tips for meal prepping? Leave them in the comments below. After all, who does not love a good meal prep hack?

Part 1: How to Smash Your 2019 Nutrition Goals

The ultimate guide to crushing your nutrition goals

 

You know the saying, “Fail to plan. Plan to fail,” well today we are going to attack this full throttle. 

Have you ever found yourself asking, Why can’t I force myself to go to the gym before work? Meal prep on Sundays? Stop snacking when I am not hungry? Why am I so friggin’ bad at changing?

Even the most motivated people can get stuck, frustrated, and lose hope during the process of behavioral change. Change is really, really, really hard. But if we set ourselves up to succeed by establishing clear nutritional goals that are strategic and sustainable we increase the likelihood of our success. Today we are going to outline the critical steps we need to take to be successful with our nutrition goals. While these steps may sound easy in theory, following through with them is the hardest part. When things get hard – what do we do? We give up. And I am here to make sure that doesn’t happen 🙂 

 

Establish a strong ‘why’ 

 

Just around this time each year everyone seems to start losing their mojo when it comes to their hard-set New Year’s resolutions. As Elon Musk once said, “When you are not progressing, you are regressing.” So, in order to progress, you need to have your “why” firmly planted in your mind. If you don’t, you’ll likely lose focus and back peddle. So I am here to give you the kick in the booty to hit that reset button and get your head back in the game.

Goal setting is SO important. But to be honest with you most people set some pretty ‘weak’ nutrition goals. I am not saying their intentions are poor. I am just saying that after 20 years of working in the fitness and nutrition industry I very rarely see well composed nutrition goals. Most people’s goals tend to be far too ambiguous. They tend to be vague and focus on outcomes we have very little control over rather than behaviors.

But don’t freak out my friend – you are not in trouble. Truth be told – no one probably ever taught you how to set solid goals. But guess what? That is all going to end today. Professor P is in the house! I am going to give you the 411 on how to set effective nutrition goals and smash every one of them.

 

The five critical steps to setting nutrition goals 

 

This blog is going to be part of a series on goal setting. There are 5 key critical steps necessary to be successful with executing your nutrition goals. We don’t want to rush through them. Instead we are going to take our time and tackle each one step by step. The five key steps to setting and accomplishing goals like a boss are as follows:

  1. Define clear nutrition goals
  2. Establish a realistic game plan
  3. Create an effective monitoring tool
  4. Execute your goals like the champ you are
  5. Assess your goals at regular intervals

 

Let’s get started with the most important step of them all.

 

Step1: clearly define your nutrition goals

 

Ask yourself: what is really most important right now for me to accomplish?

What is my numero uno nutrition goal? Think lowest hanging fruit here! What is the one thing, if I changed right now, would provide the biggest return on my health investment? No need to go crazy with creating a gazillion goals. Choose 1-2 goals which are MOST important to YOU and can have the biggest potential impact on your health.

Let’s set some hard and fast rules. Rule number 1 – all of your goals MUST be S.M.A.R.T. goals. They must have the following criteria no matter what.  

 

nutrition goal

 

We will circle back to these confines in one moment. So hang tight.

 

Focus on what you can change – your behavior 

 

It is critical to focus your goals on BEHAVIOR change NOT outcomes. The truth of the matter is that the journey to success starts with a goal and finishes with a desired outcome. Goals pave the path to achieving our desired outcomes. 

An example of an outcome would be = I want to lose 15 pounds. If the intended outcome is to lose 15 pounds I want you to think about what specific behaviors need to be modified to help you achieve this outcome. Zero in on the behaviors – forget the outcomes. What matters most is modifying the behavior change.

Outcomes like weight loss are often dependent on outside forces we cannot control. Therefore, by focusing on behavior change we have complete control over whether or not we are successful with our goals. Some examples of modifiable behaviors are – excessive snacking, minimal exercise, increased consumption of fast-food or convenience foods, going too long without eating, not taking the time to plan and not making the time to cook.

 

 

So let’s stick with the example of the outcome that you want to lose 15 pounds by April 1st. How do we turn that into a S.M.A.R.T. goal? Easy peasy – we pick the associated behavior that if we modified helps bring us closer to reaching our outcome.

 

Meal prep – an admirable goal 

 

Let’s say you are a sub-par meal planner. And because of this you end up eating high calorie convenience foods that are loaded in calories and unsavory ingredients. This behavior supports your current weight; rather than bringing you closer to your goal weight of being 15 pounds lighter. So let’s create a clear S.M.A.R.T. goal to combat this behavior. 

 

Every Sunday and Wednesday I will set aside 1.5 hours per day to meal prep all my meals for the week.

 

This goal is very specific and time sensitive. We know exactly when we will be meal prepping as well as how much time we are going to block out in our schedule. It is attainable and realistic as it is only requiring 3 hours out of our week. [Note – there are 168 hours in each week. Three hours towards meal prep consumes  < 1 % of our available hours.] Lastly, it is easy to measure. We have either meal prepped our meals for the week on those two days – or we didn’t. It is therefore easy to determine whether or not you accomplished your goal.

 

Write it down 

 

Lastly, write your nutrition goals down in a visible place. Whether that be in your day planner, directly in your schedule, in a journal, on a post-it note on your desk, or on a scrap piece of paper in your wallet.

 

nutrition goals

Get your goals on!

 

Tattoo them on your arm if you think you might forget! And just to be clear you need to look at your goals often to keep them fresh on your mind. I suggest the bare minimum would be reading them first thing in the morning and right before you go to bed. 

 

Find an accountability buddy 

 

Got goals? I bet you do! Find someone whether they be a close friend, family member or a spouse and share your nutrition goals with someone you trust. That way not only can that person help you fine-tine them to ensure they are S.M.A.R.T (like you!) – but you also have someone to hold you accountable.

 

Next week we will tackle: Step # 2 in our goal setting series – Establishing a realistic game plan.  

 

Need some help? We have your back! 

 

Head spinning? Need help defining clearly defined your hard pressed nutrition goals? Well I have your back. Please feel free to schedule a one-one nutrition visit to get started on making 2019 your best nutrition year yet. Best part? My team and I accept most health insurances. Biggity boom!  

 

Hugs & High Fives, 

nutrition gaols

The Benefits of Avocados

Avocados: A Nutritional Powerhouse Loaded with Dietary Benefits

 

Avocado lovers rejoice! Which pretty much includes everyone, right !?!

Today we are going to be chatting about one of my personal favorite foods – avocados. Avocados are a nutritional powerhouse. Packed with over 20 vitamins, minerals, chock full of fiber and heart-healthy fats – avocados are a nutritional force to be reckoned with. But before we examine the benefits of avocados let’s take a look at their nutritional profile: 

nutritional information for avocados

 

 

Did you know that a ‘standard’ serving of avocado is actually 1/5 of a whole fruit?  Call me crazy but that is a super odd quantity! More importantly who the heck eats 1/5 of an avocado? How do you even divide an avocado into fifths? Most folks easily eat an whole avocado without batting an eye! Therefore, for simplicity sake throughout this article I am going to use one half an avocado as the standard for comparisons. 

However, as you can see avocados are predominantly fat and unfortunately do not come without calories. That would be a girl’s dream come true, right? In fact, we actually qualify an avocado as a high calorie, high fat, high fiber, low carbohydrate food. So while their health benefits are seemingly endless we still need to consume them responsibly. More about that later. 

So let’s get take a look at those awesome benefits! In today’s blog we are going to examine what I consider to be five of the most important nutritional benefits of avocados. In addition, we will examine different ways of incorporating avocados into your diet so you reap these awesome benefits of these tasty little nuggets of goodness. 

 

Avocados and Heart Disease

 

 

Heart disease is the most common cause of death in the world. There are several risk factors associated with increasing the risk of this deadly disease: high cholesterol and hypertension. So it would make sense to start off by discussing avocado’s potential role in decreasing these two critical risks. Let’s tackle the cholesterol piece first.

 

Avocados Contain Heart-Healthy Fats

 

What makes a food heart-healthy? You hear this buzzword tossed around all the time. But what does it really mean?

 

avocado joke

As a dietition, this joke NEVER gets old!

 

Avocados are almost all fat! In one half of an avocado there are about 10 grams of fat. This means that approximately 75-80 % of all the calories in avocados come from fat. However, foods like avocados contain what we consider “good” fats.

 

There are two types of good fats – monounsaturated (MUFAs) and polyunsaturated fats (PUFAS). Avocados contain both of these good types of fats.  So even though there is 10 grams or so of fat in a serving of avocado – about 8 grams are composed of the good fats.

 

Impact of Avocados on Cholesterol

 

Not all cholesterol is ‘bad’ or even consider dangerous from a heart-health standpoint. In the body we create and process two type of cholesterol: LLD and HDL cholesterol.

 

 

avocado

 

Most cardiologists identify LDL as the type of cholesterol we should be most concerned with. LDL cholesterol is responsible for depositing cholesterol into our arteries. While HDL cholesterol actually does the opposite. HDL cholesterol helps remove the cholesterol from our arteries and disposes of it through our liver.

Therefore, we consider LDL our LOUSY cholesterol level and we want that value low. While HDL is considered our HEALTHY cholesterol and we want this value HIGH.

Back to lovely avocados. The monounsaturated fats in avocados can have a positive effect on heart-health when replacing saturated fats (aka “bad” fats). These heart-healthy fats can help lower overall cholesterol, raise HDL and lower LDL. Can someone say Trifecta?!

 

 

nutrients in avocados

 

 

However, just like anything any food (no matter how healthy!) it important to practice portion control with avocados. Depending on its size, like I have aforementioned, a whole avocado clocks in at about 300 + calories and easily 20 grams of fat. Yes, just like we mentioned these ARE good fats. Nonetheless, we need to be responsible with our food choices. Please feel free to eat avocados daily. Just make sure to count them towards your daily calorie and fat totals.  

 

Avocados and Hypertension

 

Hypertension affects ⅓ of all Americans and is the number one risk factor for heart disease. So how do avocados come into play with this deadly disease? Avocados are high in a nutrient called potassium. A potassium rich diet may help reduce hypertension, fluid retention, protect against stroke and even help prevent osteoporosis [1, 2, & 3]. Whoa. That is a powerful nutrient.

 

Role of Potassium on Hypertension

 

Potassium is the third most abundant mineral in the body. It serves many roles in the body all of which depend on the chemical gradient in which it creates.  Potassium helps maintain fluid balance, regulates muscle contractions (like in the heart!) as well as sends nerves singles throughout the body. In fact, potassium plays a role in every heartbeat. A hundred thousand times a day, potassium is responsible for triggering your heart to squeeze blood through your body. It also helps your muscle move, kidneys function and makes sure those nerves of yours are functioning properly.

 

Avocados and Potassium

 

However, it’s no surprise most people don’t consume enough potassium. After all, the highest source of potassium are fruits and vegetables. And truth be told people are surely slacking in this department.

 

 

nutrients in avocados

Avocados are full of many important nutrients

 

 

In one half of an avocado there is around 350 – 400 mg of potassium. Most health officials (including myself!) recommend consuming 3500 – 4700 mg of potassium per day. In this situation – the more the merrier for sure. Therefore, by consuming avocados regularly in your diet you can inch your way closer to meeting this value.

 

Avocados and Fiber

 

Like potassium most folks don’t consume enough fiber. Also like potassium we find the majority of fiber in fruits and veggies as well as complex starches. The average American consumes a whopping 13 grams of fiber per day. Curious where you come in with fiber consumption? Click here to access the fiber content of commonly consumed foods. Optimal fiber intake is set at 25 – 30 grams per day. So we are off by a landslide! Enter our little buddy the avocado.

 

avocado

In one half of an avocado, there is about 5 grams of fiber. Not bad for a food that is mostly composed of fat!

Consuming foods that are high in fiber have been linked to reducing the risk of obesity, Type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Fiber also adds bulk to our diet and promotes satiety. Avocados contain a high amount of insoluble fiber. When consumed with an adequate amount of fluid, insoluble fiber promotes optimal digestive health and bowel regularity. Insoluble fiber increases the rate at which material moves through the GI tract. It also generates larger, softer stools that are easier to pass, which helps prevent constipation and strained bowel movements. Lastly, if you suffer from diverticulitis consuming avocados regularly can help prevent flares of this painful condition.

 

Avocados are Rich in Antioxidants

 

Avocados contain vitamins A, C and E. All three are are antioxidants that help strengthen your immune system. Carotenoids such as beta-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin also act as antioxidants and are found in avocados. This abundance of antioxidants helps prevent disease and has been shown to reduce the risk or prevent the progression of cancer.

“Among the twenty most commonly eaten fruits, avocado ranks number one for vitamin E, the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, glutathione and beta-sitosterol,” writes ophthalmologist and author of SuperFoods HealthStyle, Steven G. Pratt.  Lutein is one of two carotenoids that form the macular pigment found in the center of the retina.  High concentrations of lutein are also found in the lens of the eye. Higher intake of lutein, zeaxanthin and glutathione are associated with reduced risk of cataracts and macular degeneration. Glutathione, called by some experts as the Mother of All Antioxidants, also help fights oxidative stress and free radical damage. Therefore, want to protect your sight? Regularly include avocados in your diet  ♥

 

Avocados Taste Delicious 

 

I had to save the best for last. Reason number 5 for consuming avocados – they taste delicious. When ripe, most avocados have a buttery texture and mild, but nutty flavor profile. It is this fairly muted flavor that lends nicely to pairings with other stronger more overpowering ingredients.

It is impossible to discuss avocados without mentioning guacamole. I feel like if I was stranded on a desert island the only three things I would need to be happy would be: 1. my husband 2. guacamole and 3. peanut butter (off course!) One of my very favorite finds at Trader Joe’s and a staple in The Plano’s home is their Guiltless Guacamole made with Greek Yogurt. With only 30 calories per tablespoon there is very little NOT to love about this food. Got a bag of ripe avocados? Why not make your own guacamole using Alton Brown’s easy to follow guacamole recipe. 

avocado

Trader Joe’s Guiltless Guacamole – Yum all day long!

 

While most commonly consumed in the form of guacamole there are SOOOO many other tasty ways to consume avocados. Here is a fairly basic list of 23 Delicious Ways to Consume Avocados. But if you want to get fancy Epicurious has got you covered with 24 Ways to Eat an Avocado. Please check out # 4 (Hello, Chocolate mousse!) and # 22 which provides new face for an old-time favorite avocado toast. Therefore, there is no shortage of delicious ways to incorporate avocados into your lifestyle.

I know you kiddos are super creative! Was is your favorite way of using these tasty little nutrition powerhouses? Please share in the comments below.

 

Hugs & High Fives,

Amy

 

 

References

1. Schardt D. Potassium: Bones, stones, & strokes on the line. Nutrition Action Healthletter. 2004;31(10):8-9.

2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Part D, Section 7: Fluid and Electrolytes. The Report of the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee on Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005. Available here.

3. Alderman MH. Presidential Address: 21st Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Hypertension: Dietary sodium and cardiovascular disease: The ‘J’-shaped relation. J Hypertens. 2007;25(5):903-907.

 

Know someone who might benefit from this awesome article on avocados? Please share using the links below. After all, sharing is caring 🙂 

Keto vs Atkins: what’s actually the difference?

Keto vs Atkins: what’s actually the difference?

 

Keto vs Atkins: what’s actually the difference?

 

Both are low carb, high in fat and share a large majority of the same principles but there are differences. We are going to get to the bottom of this mystery once and for all.  

 

The Great Debate: Carbohydrates Versus Fat

 

Few things in the world of nutrition have been debated as much as “carbohydrates vs fat.” For decades we’ve been told fat is detrimental to our health. Meanwhile low-fat “diet” products, often full of sugar (and crap!) flood just about every aisle in the supermarket. Meanwhile, our population seemingly gets fatter, sicker and takes more medications than ever.

 

Keto

To eat carbs or not to eat carbs. That is the age-old question.

 

Therefore, it is no surprise that over the last few decades, low carbohydrate diets have made a resurgence. Also thankfully the pendulum has finally swung in a promising direction as it relates to fat intake. Many health professionals now support that a low carb diet is a viable option to treat obesity and other chronic, Western diseases.

Yay finally for legit science!

However, despite advances in research there still seems to be confusion among the various low carb diets. In fact, one of the common statements I hear in my practice from patients is that they are following a ketogenic diet. But are they really?

More often that not – upon a quick review of their actual eating patterns it becomes apparent their eating style is more consistent with an Atkins diet rather than of a strict ketogenic diet. But does it really matter? Aren’t all low carb diets created equal and illicit the same results? The answer as you will see is not that simple.

 

It is important to note the goal of this blog is purely informational. As a practitioner I have no personal bias as it relates to a low carbohydrate diet. This means I am neither for or against them. I meet my patients in their health journey ‘where they are’.

With that being said it is important to me that my patients are properly educated and not misinformed. Therefore, the intention of this blog is not to debate whether or not a low carb diet is healthy. The intention is to instead to address the differences and similarities of two of the most popular low carbohydrate diets: The Atkins Diet and the Ketogenic diet (aka just Keto).  Both are low carb and share a large majority of principles and beneficial outcomes, but a few subtle differences exist too. But what are the main difference between these two diets? And do these differences really matter? Does one promote more long term health benefits? Let’s get some answers. 

 

Similarities Between Atkins & Keto  

 

Before we examine what makes both diets unique it is critical to address the similarities between Keto and Atkins. I believe it these striking similarities that often have someone thinking they are following one type of low carb diet; when in fact they are following a different approach.

 

Both are Low Carb Diets

 

At the most basic levels, both Atkins and Keto are low carb diets. However, surprisingly there is no standard definition of what actually constitutes  the term “low carb”. Both Keto and Atkins respectively present and adhere to their own definitions. As you will see, it is these very definitions that set Keto and Atkins apart from one another.

 

Both are Built on the Premise of Ketosis

 

Definitions aside, it is fair to make the general assumption that a low carb diet restricts carbohydrates, such as those found in sugary foods, pasta, fruit and bread. For both diets, their success centers around lowering the body’s carbohydrate intake in an effort to lower insulin and consequently burn fat as fuel. This process is known as ketosis.

In the absence of carbohydrates the body produces ketones. Ketones are an alternative fuel source for the body to use when blood sugar (glucose) is in short supply. The goal of both Keto and Atkins is to tap into the body’s fat burning potential. Once this switch is flipped, the body changes from burning carbohydrates to fat.

 

Keto

Therefore, by restricting carbohydrates, insulin levels decrease, and fat burning increases dramatically. As we will see in this blog, ketosis plays a pivotal role in each of the diets but in different ways, thus affecting how sustainable each diet is in the long run.

 

Both Diets Place an Emphasis on Dietary Fat

 

High fats foods such a meat, eggs, full fat dairy and liberal amounts of fats form the backbone of both Atkins and Keto. However, Keto greatly favors calories come from fat. While in Atkins, fat receives less of an emphasis, with a more dramatic shift towards higher protein lower carb consumption.

 

Both Diets Provide Similar Health Benefits

 

Atkins was created specifically for weight loss. While Keto was developed in the 1920’s as a treatment option for epilepsy. But recent research suggests the Keto and Atkins diets may provide health benefits including by not limited to weight loss, optimized blood sugar, improved insulin sensitivity, even reduced risks of various cancers and some neurodegenerative diseases (1, 2).

The Keto Diet

 

Keto by definition is a high fat, moderate protein, very low carbohydrate diet. The dietary approach is linear from start to “finish”. There is no maintenance plan once you reach your goal. Instead, you sustain the same fixed eating patterns indefinitely.

The Specifics of a Ketogenic Diet

 

♥ 5 – 10% of energy from carbs

♥ 20 – 30% of energy from proteins

♥ 65 – 80% of energy from fats

 

The primary goal of eating in tune with these specific percentages is to get the body in ketosis. By following this high fat, moderate protein, low carb diet the individual is able to significantly lower their insulin levels. This radical shift in fuels prompts the body from burning from glucose to creating and using ketones. In turn, facilitating fat burning.

 

Keto

Keto is a high fat, moderate protein,low carb diet.

 

 

Let’s be clear about something. Keto is a high fat diet. Not a high protein diet. So you don’t need/want huge amounts of protein. Protein in excess of what your body uses/needs can be converted to glucose, making it more challenging to get in (and stay!) in ketosis. Most people who think they are following Keto often fail to recognize this piece. They get confused with Atkins where protein intake is unregulated and encouraged. They think the same applies for Keto. Well, it does not. On Keto, protein intake needs to be determined and adhered to in order to maximize results.  

 

Long Term Compliance on Keto

 

When following a true Keto diet, long term compliance with these specific guidelines is critical. If the  guidelines are violated, the benefits of ketosis will not be actualized and the individual may actually end up gaining weight.

Therefore, in embarking on Keto the individual must make (and sustain!) significant, permanent, lifestyle changes. No compromising. No backing away. Just a full lifestyle adjustment regarding how you view food and nutrition. No biggie, right ?

 

Why You Need to Know your Baseline Calorie Needs on Keto

 

I know counting calories is often noted as not necessary on Keto. However, I am going to disagree here. Think about it. Keto relies on very specific percentages based on total calories consumed. While I agree due metabolic adaptations in relation to hormone regulation you can likely consume a higher level of calories – you still need a starting point for calories. If you do not establish a baseline level of calories, it is impossible to determine the actual percentages of fat, protein and carbohydrates you need to consume. Therefore, you need a starting point for calories to base your percentages off of. Makes sense, right?

 

The Atkins Diet

 

Now let’s transition to the examining the Atkins diet and what makes it is this approach unique.

 

The Specifics of the Atkins Diet

 

The Atkins diet is promoted in four phases: Induction, Balancing, Fine-Tuning and Maintenance.  The first phase is the most restrictive and vaguely resembles the overall platforms of a ketogenic diet with one major caveat; there is no restriction on protein just carbohydrates. As time progresses and the individual gets closer to their goal weight complex carbohydrate intake increases and the diet becomes less carbohydrate restrictive.

 

The 4 Phases of Atkins

 

Induction: Carbohydrates are restricted to no more than 20 grams per day. Emphasis is placed on high fat and high protein foods, with the source of carbohydrates coming from dark, leafy greens.

Balancing: Nuts are incorporated, low carbohydrate vegetables and small amounts of fruit.

Fine-tuning: As someone approaches their goal weight, they begin to add more carbohydrates slowing down weight loss.

Maintenance: High fiber carbohydrates are significantly increased and based on an individual’s level of  “tolerance” more or less or added.

 

The Basics of Atkins

 

Fat: No defined amount although liberal consumption of high fat foods are encouraged

Protein: No defined amount although liberal consumption of high protein foods are encouraged

Carbohydrates: < 20 net grams of carbohydrates per day during Induction phase with increasing amount through the 4 phases

 

There are no restrictions placed on fat consumption. More importantly, there is no restriction on protein. You are encouraged to eat as much protein and fat as long as you keep your carbohydrates where they need to be in each respective phase. You don’t need to ‘hit’ specific percentages for your macronutrients. Additionally, you can eat as many calories as you like. Therefore, depending upon your personal eating style this can become a high calorie, high fat, high protein, low carbohydrate diet.

 

How Keto and Atkins are Different

 

So we have addressed both the similarities and the respective differences of Keto and Atkins. Now let’s talk about how they compare. Here is a summary of the keys points.

 

Keto

Differing Factor

Atkins

Keto

Carbohydrate Leve​​​​ls

Changes from phase to phase, starting with drastic reductions followed by gradual reintroduction.
Relatively Fixed level: Approximately 5-10% of total calories.

Carbohydrate Monitoring Method

Net carbohydrates
Total carbohydrates

Protein Intake

No limit
Often based pm approximately 1-1.5 grams of protein for each kg of bodyweight.

Fat Intake

No set amount – high fat foods encouraged
High fat intake. As much as 65 – 85% total calories.

Progression

4 phase process where carbs are slashed then gradually reintroduced.
Once nutritional ketosis is achieved optimal carb, fat and protein levels remain unchanged.

Ketone Production

Ketosis highest during phase 1. After that ketosis is decreased as carbs are slowly reintroduced.
Optimal production levels maintained throughout course of diet.

Time When Individual Achieves Ketosis

With ketosis the Atkins diet looks to achieve it in phase 1.
Depends on the individual.

 

Distribution of Macronutrients

 

Perhaps the most significant difference between Keto and Atkins is how the macronutrients are specifically distributed. Macronutrients (aka ‘Macros’) are the amount of carbohydrates, fat and protein someone should consume based on their specific needs. Keto as you have seen is highly specific with finite macronutrient ratios. While Atkins promotes a level of food quality (high fat, high protein, low carb) but makes no mention of actual quantity.

 

Carbohydrates

 

There is no denying the fact both diets are low in carbohydrates. However, long term Keto promotes a consistent lower carbohydrate diet. Generally speaking, most people on Keto keep their carbs below 30 – 50 grams for.ever. Yes, as already noted, there are no phases or progression of carbohydrates for Keto. Just one steadfast, unwavering level of uniform carbohydrate intake.  

In the Induction phase, carbs on Atkins are set at 20 grams or under. However, as the individual progresses through the various phases additional carbohydrates are added. While these additional carbohydrates are not ‘junk’ carbs – the body still recognizes them with a similar blood sugar response. Additional carbohydrates promote an increase in blood sugar. This rise in blood sugar drives up insulin. Ultimately, knocking the individual out of ketosis.

Which raises the question: “Is Atkins a ketogenic diet?” The answer would be: “No.”

Atkins unfortunately diet does not turn you into a fat burner for the long haul. This is simply because as you progress you are allowed to eat an upward of 100 grams of carbs per day. This amount (for many) is sufficient for your body to keep burning sugar for fuel – not fat. Keto, on the other hand, requires sticking to 30 – 50 grams of carbs per day increasing the likelihood of long term ketosis.

 

 

Are All Carbs Created Equal?

 

One area of carb counting that can get a little confusing is the whole “net” carbohydrate situation. Atkins utilizes a net approach to counting carbohydrates. While Keto counts total carbohydrates. Don’t worry, though — it’s not nearly as confusing as it sounds.

Net carbohydrates are what you’re left with after subtracting the grams of fiber per serving from the total carbohydrate amount per serving. In this approach, you can also subtract sugar alcohols as well such as xylitol, sorbitol and erythritol.

For example, if an item has 30 grams of carbohydrates and it contains 10 grams of fiber, then the amount of net carbs the item contains is 20 grams.

According the creators of Atkins, the method to the madness is the net carb amount reflects the grams of carbohydrate that significantly impact blood sugar level. This follows the assumption there is little to no impact of both fiber and sugar alcohols on blood sugar. Therefore, when following Atkins these are are the only carbs you need to count. Foods that are low in net carbs such as nutrient-dense vegetables and low glycemic fruits such as berries don’t cause a significant impact on blood sugar and therefore are less likely to interfere with weight loss.

When it comes to counting carbs on Keto it really depends who you ask! Some true devotees of Keto will count total carbohydrates independent of fiber. While others followers of Keto aim for 20-25 grams of net carbs OR ~ 50 grams of total carbs. Either way you slice it the goal is to keep carbohydrates low enough to decrease insulin levels and facilitate fat burning.

 

Fat

 

The Dietary Guidelines set forth by the U.S. government promote a diet containing 20-35 % of total calories coming from fat. Therefore, comparatively Keto is considered a very high fat diet with 65 – 85 % total calories coming from fat. Atkins is also higher in fat than your typical recommended diet. But not as high as Keto. The emphasis is slightly different with Atkins. The focus to is instead on removing carbs while equally boosting protein and fats.

Also unlike Keto, there is no set amount of daily fat you are required to consume on Atkins. The main emphasis on Atkins is to keep carbohydrates below the set level for each phase. While high fat foods are encouraged, fat intake can vary from person to person.

 

Protein

 

On Keto an ‘adequate’ or ‘moderate’ amount of protein is encouraged. While on Atkins protein intake (like fat intake) has no set amount. Therefore, it is possible for Atkins to become a low carbohydrate, high protein, high fat diet. Why does this matter?

Certain factors like eating too much protein can (for some individuals) get in the way of ketosis and increase the need for gluconeogenesis. Gluconeogenesis is just a fancy term for making glucose from non-glucose sources like protein and fat. It’s a process when your body converts excess protein or dietary fat you eat into blood sugar for energy. Some researchers believe the protein sources commonly consumed on a low carb diet have the propensity to raise insulin levels. In response to an increase in insulin levels, ketogenesis is downregulated.

This is why eating ‘too’ much protein can impair some individual’s ability to get in and stay in ketosis.  But, this does not mean you should restrict your protein consumption either!  But what it does mean is someone following Keto NEEDs to determine their adequate level of protein intake.  A good general rule of thumb is to aim for 1.0 – 1.5 grams of protein per kg body (3). To convert your weight into kg simply multiply your weight in pounds by 0.45.

 

Keto

 

By taking the time to determine what a moderate level of protein intake looks like, the individual on Keto can both optimize their fat burning potential and prevent lean muscle breakdown.  However, your protein needs are dependent on your activity level, weight, height, gender, body composition, stress and inflammation levels in your body, etc. So keep in mind this calculation is a very basic way to determine adequate protein intake. If you are a competitive athlete you will likely need to adjust this value.

 

Comparative Summary

 

In summary, it is fair to say when it comes to Keto and Atkins, Keto is much more specific with very finite guidelines. While Atkins can be seen as more ‘loosey-goosey.’ In order to achieve the benefits of Keto you have to be very precise.  While the Atkins diet is more flexible. Hence Atkins could be seen as less intimidating prompting more people to try their hand at this approach. With that being said, some people thrive on a rule-based approach. They need profound structure because otherwise they’re going try to break/bend the rules at any occasion they see fit. So, it really comes down to the individual.

 

Which One is Better?

 

In all honesty, despite their similarities and differences I really don’t know which one is ‘better’ per say. My person stance is and always has been “Different strokes, for different folks.” My goal is to meet my patients where they are and guide them based on the scientific evidence that exists. I personally think an argument could be made for pretty much any dietary approach out there. SO I guess it really lies in someone’s goals, level of dedication, persona and long term personal outlook on health and wellness.

Some people just can’t wrap their arms around a low carb, high fat diet. It is SO foreign to them. While others, embrace this dietary approach with unwavering optimism. I think the big thing with either diet is knowing the score. Based on my knowledge, the intention of Keto is more of a true lifestyle change. While Atkins (seems for most) to be a fairly short-term guide to weight loss. So if you are as they say, ”In it to win it,” I would recommend you go ‘all in’ with Keto and do it right.  

 

Keto

 

But truth be told – I have never.ever.ever. met anyone to be consistent long-term with either approach. Inevitably for most — pizza happens 🙂 But maybe that is just the circle of patients, friends and family members I run with?

Well, I guess that is not true. Research supports long term compliance (> 12 months) on a very low carb diet in the general population is fairly low (4, 5). Surprised? I didn’t think so. Does that mean this approach is wrong? No. It just means a very low carbohydrate diet is very hard to sustain.

Also I can only speak from my personal clinical experience. But once people go back to eating normal- carbs and all – they seem to gain weight back with interest. That is because each gram of carbohydrates pulls into 3-6 grams of water into the body. When you get significantly decrease of the carbohydrates – you simply take on less water. Increasing protein intake can also have a diuretic effect on the body. Therefore, it is not a surprise when a person goes off a low carb diet – they often experience shifts in fluids and therefore fluctuations in weight.

So I guess the next question becomes can we get the benefits of a ketogenic diet without being going gangbusters with Keto or Atkins? The answer is YES. If there is any uniform message here the key to success is managing insulin. And ‘Hello!” there are numerous ways to that! Last we I talked your ear off about Intermittent Fasting. But you don’t have to go Keto or even engage in Intermittent Fasting if that is not your bag. In fact, the number one insulin sensitizer is exercise!!! Plus, exercise has a host of other extremely beneficial side effects beyond just lowering and managing insulin. So why not start with the lowest hanging fruit? No need to complicate matters anymore than they already are 🙂

And one more thing. What gets measured gets managed. Really want to knock it out of the ball park? Start tracking every morsel that goes in your mouth. And I do mean everything! Because before you even begin thinking about changing your dietary approach you need to understand the current status of your diet. The only way to do that is track what you eat and review the data. Plain and simple.

Need help getting started? Why not enlist the help of one of fabulous Plano Program’s Registered Dietitians? They can not only help you determine the most effective food tracking platform – but they can provide an overall assessment of both the quality and quantity (Hello macros!) of your diet. The best part? They are likely covered by your health insurance. So why not take advantage of the awesome opportunity to have someone help you determine what to eat? Make an appointment now by clicking here

Phew. That was a mouthful! I am hopeful you found the information helpful. If anything I hope it empowers you to select the most appropriate dietary approach when it comes to low carbohydrate diets.

 

Hugs & High Fives,

Amy

P.S. What have been your personal experiences with low carb diets? Do you find one type of low carb diet was easier to sustain than the other? After reading this were you following one type of low carb diet – when you really were following another type? Please share your experience in the comments below. 

 

 

References

  1. Halton TL, Willett WC, Liu S, et al. “Low-carbohydrate-diet score and the risk of coronary heart disease in women.” N Engl J Med. 2006;355:1991-2002.
  2. Halton TL, Liu S, Manson JE, Hu FB. “Low-carbohydrate-diet score and risk of type 2 diabetes in women. “ Am J Clin Nutr. 2008;87:339-46.
  3. American College of Sports Medicine position stand. “Nutrition and athletic performance. American Dietetic Association., Dietitians of Canada.,” American College of Sports Medicine., Rodriguez NR, Di Marco NM, Langley S.Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009 Mar; 41(3):709-31.
  4. Hu T., Yao L., Reynolds K., Niu T., Li S., Whelton P. K., He J., Steffen L. M., and Bazzano L. A. (2016) Adherence to low‐carbohydrate and low‐fat diets in relation to weight loss and cardiovascular risk factors. Obesity Science & Practice, 2: 24–31.
  5. Grant D Brinkworth, Manny Noakes, Jonathan D Buckley, Jennifer B Keogh, Peter M Clifton; Long-term effects of a very-low-carbohydrate weight loss diet compared with an isocaloric low-fat diet after 12 mo, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 90, Issue 1, 1 July 2009,  23–32.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Taco Tuesday: Hip-Hop-Horray!

It’s National Taco Day – Grab Those Partay Pants

 

First of all — stop the press. Did you know that TODAY, October 2nd is National Taco Day?

I know.  First,  it was National Peanut Day. Now this. Can you even stand the excitement? Don’t get me wrong. I know that every Tuesday is in fact Taco Tuesday. But most importantly today is THE Taco Tuesday. 

 

 

Taco Tuesday

I have NEVER met a taco I did not like 🙂

 

I don’t know about you but I love Mexican food. I can pretty much eat some rendition of Mexican food every day. After all, what is there NOT to like about Mexican food? First there is meat, then cheese, guacamole, jalapenos, tomatoes and might I add … maybe more cheese?  So let’s celebrate this glorious day with some healthy Mexican taco recipes. Yes you heard that right. Mexican CAN be healthy. I got you covered, I promise.

 

Buen provecho! (Enjoy your meal in Spanish).

 

Taco Bowls

 

I am a bowl and spoon type of girl. So that is why I lead the list of recipes with 9 Healthy Taco Bowls for When you Want to Ditch the Shell. For me, the actual taco shell just does not do it. Also it’s what inside the shell that really counts and the possibilities are seemingly endless. Most importantly, there is something in this list of recipes for everyone here. Meat eaters and vegans alike can hold hands and dig in knowing their respective bellies will be full. 

Taco Tuesday

        Check out these tasty taco bowls from Slim Sanity! Yum!

 

Watching your carbs? Then check out this easy recipe for Turkey Taco Spaghetti Squash Boats. Vegetarian? Or ground turkey meat just not your thing? Why not try substituting Boca Crumbles or Beyond Beef Crumbles. You will not even miss the meat 🙂

 

Taco Stuffed Peppers

 

From my experience people seem to have a ‘love or hate’ relationship with peppers. So for all the lovers out there I am sharing my favorite recipe for Taco Stuffed Peppers by the Cozy Cook. I am hopeful once you try these this bad boys stuffed with ground beef, cheese, salsa and sour cream – the fact they are even peppers will become a non-issue.

 

Taco Stuffed Peppers

Taco Stuffed Peppers by the Cozy Cook

 

Just a couple of substitutions I would suggest to this recipe. I am assuming the ground beef is referring to an 80/20 blend. I would suggest either ground sirloin which is generally 93/7 or 90/10 depending on the brand. Or you could also substitute ground chicken or ground turkey to lower the saturated fat content of the recipe as well. The Boca Crumbles or Beyond Beef Crumbles would also work lovely here as well.

 

Taco Seasoning – Avoiding the Ick Factor 

As for the Taco Seasoning in this recipe most commercial packets are loaded with sodium and often even MSG. So what I might suggest is you either make your own special blend or choose a low sodium brand with the least number of words you cannot pronounce.

Don’t believe me that there are all sorts of wacky things in your taco seasoning click here to find out what is lurking.  Note the second ingredient is salt. Also in case you didn’t know the term “partially hydrogenated soybean oil” is just a fancy name for trans fats. Don’t let the trans fats crash our Taco Tuesday party.

Here is a simple recipe to make your own taco seasoning.

Lastly, if you are looking to shave off a couple calories (40) and grams of fat (4) you can buy Trader Joes Light Mexican Cheese. I am a SUPER FAN. 

 

Taco Salad

 

Well, we can’t chat about healthy taco recipes without mentioning taco salads. Depending upon what you put on a taco salad this is a great vehicle to get your Mexican on without a boat load of calories.

However, don’t be fooled. Most taco salads come in deep-fried taco bowls and clock in around 1000 calories per salad. Not to mention they can be sodium bombs.

So why not just make your own? That way you can control all the toppings and make the salad as healthy as you want. Try this recipe from one of my favorite recipes sites Well Plated for a delicious Skinny Taco Salad.

 

 

 

Taco Salad

Skinny Taco Salad from Well Plated

 

As with anything you can always tweak the ingredients. For example if you are watching your carbs you might nix the tortilla, black bean and/or corn. Or just scale back the quantity of each. Generally each cup of corn is about 15 grams of carbs. While each cup of beans is about 45 grams carbs. Depending on the brand, tortillas range from 10 grams each  all the way to up 60 grams. In our house we love the low carbohydrate wraps from Trader Joes. We use them for everything from tacos, fajitas and quesadillas to DIY low-carb tortilla chips. 

 

 

Taco Tuesday

Make Tacos. Not war.

 

Well I hope you found some inspiration in these recipes. After all it is not every day is National Taco Day! So please enjoy because National Taco Day only comes around every 365 days 🙂 

 

Got healthy taco recipes? I know YOU do my fellow Mexican food lover. Please share in the comments below. Our community will thank you for doing so ♥ ♥ ♥

 

      Hugs & High Fives,

       Amy

 

What is intermittent fasting: Amy Plano, RD gives you the 411

What is intermittent fasting: Amy Plano, RD gives you the 411

Is Breakfast the Most Important Meal of the Day?

 

Back in the day (many, many, many moons ago!) when I was in grad school I remember one thing being drilled into our heads by our Professors – “Encourage your patients to eat more often.” For years, we’ve been told it’s important to eat breakfast within an hour of waking up in an effort to ‘rev up’ our metabolism. To this day, we preach to our patients to eat small, frequent meals and snacks throughout the day to the same effect. But a more recent trend, intermittent fasting, seems to have thrown a cog in the wheel of this nonsense we have been propagating for way too long. This highly effective technique relies on restricting your eating to set times and alternating between feasting and fasting.

The goal of this blog is to define the most popular form of intermittent fasting 16:8, its health implications as well why it seems to work. Future blogs will address the details of IF including when and what to eat as well as the new emerging research as it relates to weight loss, diabetes prevention and reversal as well as optimizing body composition.

 

What is intermittent fasting?

 

Intermittent fasting is a hot topic. No matter where I seem to go – someone seems to be chatting up intermittent fasting (IF). But what the heck is IF? And more importantly why is everyone talking about it?

Intermittent fasting has recently emerged as a popular eating style. IF has dietary implications for everything from weight management, to mitigating inflammation to even decreasing the ugly symptoms of chemotherapy. Research suggests the timing of the fast is key. This powerful approach to eating has the potential for IF to serve as a realistic, sustainable, and effective approach for weight loss, as well as for diabetes prevention (1).

 

intermittent fasting

 

In an attempt to streamline my efforts, this blog (and future blogs on the topic) will focus on the body composition and the weight management applications of intermittent fasting. However, that does not mean the other benefits are less important. It just means the questions I receive most commonly in my practice relate to weight loss. So it makes sense to address this aspect.

 

16:8 the most popular approach to intermittent fasting

 

There are various formats for intermittent fasting. The most common approach is referred to as time restricted intermittent fasting. In the most basic sense time restricted IF involves eating your caloric intake within a finite period (generally 8 hours) followed by a period of non-eating or fasting (generally 16 hours). This is the most popular approach to intermittent fasting and is commonly referred to as the 16:8 approach to intermittent fasting.

 

The 16:8 approach by definition is simple. The ‘16’ refers to the hours in which we are not eating and the ‘8’ refers to the eating window in which we are eating.

 

Depending upon when someone decides to execute their 16-hour fast it is very possible they might actually be sleeping for a majority of the time they are fasting! More so, for most people participating in this style of eating they are simply skipping breakfast and consequently having lunch as their first meal. If your mornings are pretty busy, or you just don’t love eating first thing in the morning – the time seems to fly by. Making this approach particularly easier than other formats such as “The 5:2 Diet” were you are encouraged to eat 500 – 600 calories on two non-consecutive days or “The Alternative Fast Diet” where you fast every other day.

 

Alternate day fasting is quite an extreme form of intermittent fasting. It may not be suitable for beginners or those with certain medical conditions. It may also be difficult to maintain this type of fasting in the long-term. Each person’s experience of intermittent fasting is individual, and different styles will suit different people. However, from my clinical experience I have seen the most success and compliance with the 16:8 approach to intermittent fasting.

intermittent fasting

 

So sounds pretty simple, right? You eat for 8 hours. You fast for 16 hours. But why is that eating window so dang important? SO glad you asked.

 

The power of insulin and intermittent fasting

 

Believe it or not there is one thing that pretty much controls how effectively we lose weight. This crucial thing is called insulin. Insulin is a powerful hormone secreted by the pancreas. Truth be told – insulin is pretty much responsible for the fate of our fat cells.

 

You see when we eat our body breaks down food into smaller components. One of these smaller units is glucose (aka sugar). The glucose from our food enters our bloodstream to be transported to our cells where it is processed and used to fuel the body. While glucose helps provide our cells with the energy they need to do their jobs; its very presence increases our levels of insulin.

 

Once the body receives the signal you’ve eaten, insulin is produced and released in response to glucose. Unfortunately, when the body senses high levels of circulating insulin it only hears one message and one message only, “Store excess calories as fat.” Insulin slows down fat burning while the body instead burns glucose from its last meal.

 

For that reason, from a body composition standpoint we want keep insulin levels as low as possible (2). We don’t want no stinkin’ fat storage! Do we? No, thank you!

 

intermittent fasting

 

I want you to think about insulin like the mission control center of your fat cells. The presence of insulin dictates whether we store calories as fat or burn them for energy. Take for example the fed state. After we have eaten a mixed meal (one with carbohydrates, protein and fat) insulin increases and a message is sent to our body to store fat. However, when we are not eating – that message is silenced. During the fasting state, the body burns more stored fat for energy. And guess what – if we burn more fat as fuel we are more likely to optimize our body composition. Bingo – now we are on to something!

 

So, is breakfast the most important meal of the day? Heck no!

 

So that reminds me. Let’s go back to that original scenario. Remember the one that has been drilled into your head about eating small frequent meals and snacks? The one that always – no matter what – starts with consuming a big healthy breakfast. Does it now make sense why that method is pretty much counter productive to optimizing body fat?

 

Think about it. If we are eating every couple of hours in an effort to as they used to say ‘put fuel on the fire’ what is constantly high? Insulin, right? If insulin is constantly high your body is constantly shoveling excess calories into your fat cells. No bueno!

 

Conclusion

 

So bottom line, in the fed state, insulin is elevated, and this signals your body to store excess calories in your fat cells. In the presence of insulin, the burning of fat is halted, while the body burns glucose (from your last meal) instead.

 

In the fasted state, insulin is low. The body starts mobilizing stored body fat from your fat cells and burns this fat for energy (instead of glucose).

 

The practical importance of all this? By choosing to follow a 16:8 time restricted form of intermittent fasting where you eat for 8 hours and fast for 16 hours you can optimize your body composition. By choosing this pattern of eating you are limiting the time in which your body is releasing insulin. Thus prompting your body to burn stored body fat while in the fasted state, while minimizing fat storage in the fed state.

 

In our next blog on this topic we will dive into the specifics of the 16:8 approach to intermittent fasting. I will teach you how to apply the 16:8 approach, how to choose the best time frame for the fast/fed state as well guide you on what to eat.

 

Don’t miss out on this exciting event

 

Did this blog get your noggin thinking? Want to learn more about the applications of intermittent fasting? If so – please come and hear Marc and I present on this very topic this Saturday, 9/29 at 11:30 am at Crossfit Milford. I guarantee this is an event you DO NOT want to miss.

 

Looking for further customization on your diet? All this talk about intermittent fasting got you confused? Then go ahead and make an appointment with either Audrey or Emily in my practice and they will help you come up with a customized meal plan using intermittent fasting.

 

Hugs & High Fives, Amy

 

P.S. Did you know The Plano Program Dietitians accept most health insurance? We sure do!

 

P.P.S. Love the information presented on intermittent fasting? Have a friend who you think could benefit? Please share the social love ♥

 

References

(1) Patterson RE, Laughlin GA, Sears DD, et al. Intermittent Fasting on Metabolic Health. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. 2015;115(8):1203-1212.

(2) Tinsley GM, La Bounty PM. Effects of intermittent fasting on body composition and clinical health markers in humans. Nutrition reviews. 2015 Oct 1;73(10):661-74.

 

 

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